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Deputy Mayor Looks at Calling in Army for Ice Storm Clean Up
Report says Norm Kelly is considering calling in army for ice storm clean up.
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Remember when former Toronto mayor Mel Lastman called in the army during the big dump of snow in 1999?  That move made Toronto the butt of numerous jokes over the years since, but it’s a move Toronto’s Deputy Mayor is considering after the massive ice storm that brought down trees and power lines throughout the city on December 21st

According to the Globe and Mail Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly said he is “exploring” whether to call in the army in order to help rid the city of downed trees and tree limbs that littered streets and came down on homes during the storm. 

“It’s just [a question of] manpower.  It’s just, if we can get a lot of guys here and we can get into neighbourhoods and just say, ‘Hey, can we give you a hand and get that stuff out?’…I’m not sure technically how the army and its reserves could fit into that, so it’s something I’m exploring,” Kelly told the Globe. 

On Thursday the city announced that it would cost $75-million to clean up the fallen trees and other debris.  The work could take up to eight weeks and would require 600 employees to work seven days a week.

A call to bring in the army must first go through the province before the request is relayed to Ottawa.

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21 0

Remember when former Toronto mayor Mel Lastman called in the army during the big dump of snow in 1999?  That move made Toronto the butt of numerous jokes over the years since, but it’s a move Toronto’s Deputy Mayor is considering after the massive ice storm that brought down trees and power lines throughout the city on December 21st

According to the Globe and Mail Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly said he is “exploring” whether to call in the army in order to help rid the city of downed trees and tree limbs that littered streets and came down on homes during the storm. 

“It’s just [a question of] manpower.  It’s just, if we can get a lot of guys here and we can get into neighbourhoods and just say, ‘Hey, can we give you a hand and get that stuff out?’…I’m not sure technically how the army and its reserves could fit into that, so it’s something I’m exploring,” Kelly told the Globe. 

On Thursday the city announced that it would cost $75-million to clean up the fallen trees and other debris.  The work could take up to eight weeks and would require 600 employees to work seven days a week.

A call to bring in the army must first go through the province before the request is relayed to Ottawa.

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