NEWS
 
Minimum wage not going up right now: Premier
Wynne says she's waiting on panel recommendations
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Last week, health care providers urged the province to bump Ontario's minimum wage up 4 dollars, from it's current $10.25. Monday, the premier struck down that suggestion.

After acknowledging calls for a $14 dollar per hour minimum wage, Kathleen Wynne says that's not going to happen in one fell swoop right now.

However, Wynne says a panel the province has set up to examine minimum wage is still at work. She says they're trying to figure out the best plan to have a systematic way of approaching increases.

Wynne underlines she doesn't want increases to be a political whim.

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  1. Frankie posted on 01/20/2014 04:59 PM
    If the Liberals are re-elected with another minority watch Horvath's NDP push this and Wynne accepting in order to stay in power.
  2. Ernie posted on 01/20/2014 08:32 PM
    And if this all happens without duties coming into effect on goods coming in from China - watch for higher unemployment and more manufacturing leaving Ontario
  3. kari posted on 01/21/2014 02:36 AM
    Why not forgo all income taxes and deductions on the poor, with gov. picking up the CPP and EI contributions, plus providing drugs, dental and daycare? This would address poverty and take some pressure off employers/
    1. donny p. posted on 01/21/2014 07:43 AM
      @kari Ummm...that's already happening. We call it welfare. CPP is only for the workies as is EI, but the working taxpayer pays for everything else.

      The downside is that for every $1.00 increase in the min. wage, employers must lay off 15% of their workers or raise their prices by 20%, thereby increasing unemployment and inflation. At a $2.50 increase, it becomes cheaper to employ technology to do much of the work and get rid of people altogether.

      Your recommendations work only in commie states, and look what happened to them.
  4. contiki posted on 01/21/2014 10:02 AM
    Any wage increases should be made in $0.25 increments, say, semi-annually rather than a dollar at a time.
  5. Angry Bill posted on 01/21/2014 03:35 PM
    This money doesn't come out of thin air.. where do socialists think the money for this increase would come from? From the employer.. small business who are just barely turning a profit, or making none at all. Force them to pay more, and both the worker and the employer will be out of work, adding even more to the burden on society.

    This helps society how?

    donny p. is smart.. he's got it.
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6 0

Last week, health care providers urged the province to bump Ontario's minimum wage up 4 dollars, from it's current $10.25. Monday, the premier struck down that suggestion.

After acknowledging calls for a $14 dollar per hour minimum wage, Kathleen Wynne says that's not going to happen in one fell swoop right now.

However, Wynne says a panel the province has set up to examine minimum wage is still at work. She says they're trying to figure out the best plan to have a systematic way of approaching increases.

Wynne underlines she doesn't want increases to be a political whim.

Leave a comment:

showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
  1. Frankie posted on 01/20/2014 04:59 PM
    If the Liberals are re-elected with another minority watch Horvath's NDP push this and Wynne accepting in order to stay in power.
  2. Ernie posted on 01/20/2014 08:32 PM
    And if this all happens without duties coming into effect on goods coming in from China - watch for higher unemployment and more manufacturing leaving Ontario
  3. kari posted on 01/21/2014 02:36 AM
    Why not forgo all income taxes and deductions on the poor, with gov. picking up the CPP and EI contributions, plus providing drugs, dental and daycare? This would address poverty and take some pressure off employers/
    1. donny p. posted on 01/21/2014 07:43 AM
      @kari Ummm...that's already happening. We call it welfare. CPP is only for the workies as is EI, but the working taxpayer pays for everything else.

      The downside is that for every $1.00 increase in the min. wage, employers must lay off 15% of their workers or raise their prices by 20%, thereby increasing unemployment and inflation. At a $2.50 increase, it becomes cheaper to employ technology to do much of the work and get rid of people altogether.

      Your recommendations work only in commie states, and look what happened to them.
  4. contiki posted on 01/21/2014 10:02 AM
    Any wage increases should be made in $0.25 increments, say, semi-annually rather than a dollar at a time.
  5. Angry Bill posted on 01/21/2014 03:35 PM
    This money doesn't come out of thin air.. where do socialists think the money for this increase would come from? From the employer.. small business who are just barely turning a profit, or making none at all. Force them to pay more, and both the worker and the employer will be out of work, adding even more to the burden on society.

    This helps society how?

    donny p. is smart.. he's got it.
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