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WATCH: Ontario fuming over federal budget
Minister Charles Sousa calls it a "kick in the teeth"
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Ontario's finance minister is livid, upset that the federal government isn't helping out the province.

Charles Sousa underlined Ontarians have been short-changed and ripped off by the federal budget. He made the comments about 45 minutes after it was tabled on Parliament Hill.

In December, Ottawa had announced Ontario won't be getting $641 million in equalization payments for health and social services. Sousa had hoped for an about-face on that decision.

He also wanted to see some form of pension reform, which wasn't there. Neither was a national transit strategy.
 
Despite what he calls a "kick in the teeth" handed to Ontario, Sousa says the province will try its best to meet deficit targets.

Meanwhile, officials at Toronto City Hall received the new budget with a decidedly ho-hum response.

"It's a steady budget ... nothing outrageous, one way or the other," says Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly.

He says he is 'delighted' to see that $660 million dollars already promised for the planned subway extension through Scarborough is included, along with a program that will help municipalities get access to funding to rebuild infrastructure after natural disasters.

"Given the history we've had with flooding and the ice storm, I am really pleased that (the Federal government) has made a $200 million commitment."

TTC Chair Karen Stintz says the new budget will be good for the city's transit system.

"The gas tax funding will be indexed for the first time this year so that gas tax money will increase to the TTC and we'll also have more flexibility in how that money is invested, so that's good news for transit," she says.

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8 0


Ontario's finance minister is livid, upset that the federal government isn't helping out the province.

Charles Sousa underlined Ontarians have been short-changed and ripped off by the federal budget. He made the comments about 45 minutes after it was tabled on Parliament Hill.

In December, Ottawa had announced Ontario won't be getting $641 million in equalization payments for health and social services. Sousa had hoped for an about-face on that decision.

He also wanted to see some form of pension reform, which wasn't there. Neither was a national transit strategy.
 
Despite what he calls a "kick in the teeth" handed to Ontario, Sousa says the province will try its best to meet deficit targets.

Meanwhile, officials at Toronto City Hall received the new budget with a decidedly ho-hum response.

"It's a steady budget ... nothing outrageous, one way or the other," says Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly.

He says he is 'delighted' to see that $660 million dollars already promised for the planned subway extension through Scarborough is included, along with a program that will help municipalities get access to funding to rebuild infrastructure after natural disasters.

"Given the history we've had with flooding and the ice storm, I am really pleased that (the Federal government) has made a $200 million commitment."

TTC Chair Karen Stintz says the new budget will be good for the city's transit system.

"The gas tax funding will be indexed for the first time this year so that gas tax money will increase to the TTC and we'll also have more flexibility in how that money is invested, so that's good news for transit," she says.

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