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Brutal winter leading to feelings of anxiety, injustice
Psychologist says snow, ice also lead to a kind of claustrophobia
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It's the winter that seems like it may never end. A season of stubborn snow piles, ice-coated sidewalks, bitter cold and biting wind.

If you've been blaming the punishing winter for your being blue or feeling lazy, you're on to something.

Psychologist Dr Oren Amitay tells Newstalk 1010 the human body is wired to slow down through the colder months to conserve energy.

He says that slowed-down programming makes us more likely to stay on the couch, less likely to go out and exercise. "That has a large effect because aerobic exercises are one of the best cures for depression or depressed states", says Amitay.

He says looking out your window to see a build up snow can create a sense of claustrophobia. That produces a sense of isolation, making you less likely to hang out with friends or members of your family.

Amitay stresses that humans are social animals who need the support of others to get through what can be a challenging period.

He recommends booking face time with someone whose company you enjoy, to break up your week and to give you something to look forward to. It doesn't have to be complicated, an hour-long meet-up for coffee, even an online video chat. The process of planning something a few weeks or months away, like a trip, can also distract you.

Amitay says this winter in particular, the cold is breeding feelings of anxiety, hopelessness, a loss of control and a sense of injustice among his patients and a lot of other Torontonians.

"Especially those whose power outages with the big blackout lasted longer than most other people. It's what makes it feel more like 'oh my god, why is it happening to me'.

Spring arrives March 20th.

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7 0

It's the winter that seems like it may never end. A season of stubborn snow piles, ice-coated sidewalks, bitter cold and biting wind.

If you've been blaming the punishing winter for your being blue or feeling lazy, you're on to something.

Psychologist Dr Oren Amitay tells Newstalk 1010 the human body is wired to slow down through the colder months to conserve energy.

He says that slowed-down programming makes us more likely to stay on the couch, less likely to go out and exercise. "That has a large effect because aerobic exercises are one of the best cures for depression or depressed states", says Amitay.

He says looking out your window to see a build up snow can create a sense of claustrophobia. That produces a sense of isolation, making you less likely to hang out with friends or members of your family.

Amitay stresses that humans are social animals who need the support of others to get through what can be a challenging period.

He recommends booking face time with someone whose company you enjoy, to break up your week and to give you something to look forward to. It doesn't have to be complicated, an hour-long meet-up for coffee, even an online video chat. The process of planning something a few weeks or months away, like a trip, can also distract you.

Amitay says this winter in particular, the cold is breeding feelings of anxiety, hopelessness, a loss of control and a sense of injustice among his patients and a lot of other Torontonians.

"Especially those whose power outages with the big blackout lasted longer than most other people. It's what makes it feel more like 'oh my god, why is it happening to me'.

Spring arrives March 20th.

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