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Sick Kids researchers question safety of baby noise machines
Senior author Dr. Blake Papsin says several available models generate noise at levels that may be unsafe for young ears.
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Researchers at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are questioning the safety of white noise machines used to help babies sleep. 

Senior author Dr. Blake Papsin says several available models generate noise at levels that may be unsafe for young ears.

He says babies brains are looking for meaningful sounds to help with auditory development.

"The whole concept of replacing periodic, lovely, incredibly complex environmental sound for the young, developing, processing brain with a babbling brook... is foolish to me," he says. 

Papsin, who heads the hospital's ear, nose and throat department, says if parents want to use these devices, they should use them for as short a period as possible and as far away from the baby as possible.

The study is published in the journal Pediatrics.

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  1. john posted on 03/03/2014 10:37 AM
    okay i am not a parent but i am a uncle and i have babysit my nice and nefu . 2 years old . and i am pertly sure that made enough noise as it is . i dont think i need a machine to do the job my niece and nefu can make on there own .
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Researchers at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children are questioning the safety of white noise machines used to help babies sleep. 

Senior author Dr. Blake Papsin says several available models generate noise at levels that may be unsafe for young ears.

He says babies brains are looking for meaningful sounds to help with auditory development.

"The whole concept of replacing periodic, lovely, incredibly complex environmental sound for the young, developing, processing brain with a babbling brook... is foolish to me," he says. 

Papsin, who heads the hospital's ear, nose and throat department, says if parents want to use these devices, they should use them for as short a period as possible and as far away from the baby as possible.

The study is published in the journal Pediatrics.

Leave a comment:

showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
  1. john posted on 03/03/2014 10:37 AM
    okay i am not a parent but i am a uncle and i have babysit my nice and nefu . 2 years old . and i am pertly sure that made enough noise as it is . i dont think i need a machine to do the job my niece and nefu can make on there own .
showing all comments

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency says there have been no reported illnesses