NEWS
 
Why did that fire make me so late for work?
Truck fire closed both Gardiner and Lakeshore on Monday morning, making thousands late for work....
0 0
Photo: CTV

It was a frustrating morning commute for thousands heading into downtown Toronto on Monday morning.

A cube van caught fire, forcing the closure of not only the Gardiner expressway, but also the Lakeshore as crews hooked up to the fire hydrant.

Stephan Powell with Toronto Fire tells Newstalk1010, that there were two pumper trucks on scene, but the water wasn't enough to fight the flames.

That's why they needed the hydrant.

Powell says part of the problem was the fact that there were two BBQ sized propane tanks on board that truck. Once they started heating up, the high pressure relief valve did it's job and let out some of the gas.

Had that not happened, there could be a major explosion.

But Powell says that propane vapour actually fed the fire, making it tougher to knock down.

Once they did, they needed to salt the roadway, since it was all iced up from the now-frozen water being poured on the fire.

He says they also needed to clean up the burnt debris from the truck.

That added to the hours of delays.

And Powell says the weather complicated things.

"Had this happened in the summer, if it was just a fire, it would have been maximum an hour."

Categories:

Leave a comment:

· Subscribe to comments
Log in and be the first to comment!

DON'T MISS

IN-DEPTH & INTERACTIVE

SOLD OUT! BUT STAY TUNED...WE'LL BE GIVING AWAY SPECIAL PASSES SOON!

TED RADIO HOUR

Welcome to TED Radio Hour hosted by Guy Raz, Saturdays at 6pm and Sundays at 7pm

 
0 0
Photo: CTV

It was a frustrating morning commute for thousands heading into downtown Toronto on Monday morning.

A cube van caught fire, forcing the closure of not only the Gardiner expressway, but also the Lakeshore as crews hooked up to the fire hydrant.

Stephan Powell with Toronto Fire tells Newstalk1010, that there were two pumper trucks on scene, but the water wasn't enough to fight the flames.

That's why they needed the hydrant.

Powell says part of the problem was the fact that there were two BBQ sized propane tanks on board that truck. Once they started heating up, the high pressure relief valve did it's job and let out some of the gas.

Had that not happened, there could be a major explosion.

But Powell says that propane vapour actually fed the fire, making it tougher to knock down.

Once they did, they needed to salt the roadway, since it was all iced up from the now-frozen water being poured on the fire.

He says they also needed to clean up the burnt debris from the truck.

That added to the hours of delays.

And Powell says the weather complicated things.

"Had this happened in the summer, if it was just a fire, it would have been maximum an hour."

Leave a comment:

· Subscribe to comments
Log in and be the first to comment!

Top stories

People are being told to stay indoors, close all doors and windows