NEWS
 
UPDATE: Chrysler no longer wants your tax dollars
The car company withdraws the request for government help for plants in Windsor and Brampton
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Chrysler says it doesn't want to be involved in a game of political football, so it's withdrawing its requests for funding from both Queen's Park and Ottawa.

The automaker says it's using its own cash to keep up production at its Windsor and Brampton plants. It's a move that will keep 7600 jobs afloat for now.

The company had been asking for $700,000 from both levels of government to refurbish the plants.

In a statement, Chrysler says Windsor will be producing a new minivan for the company, while Brampton will continue to make Chrysler 300 and the Dodge Chargers and Challengers.

Earlier in the day, the finance minister was more than willing to offer up cash, in the form of a grant or loan.

When the news broke, Economic Development Minister Eric Hoskins issued a statement saying the province "welcomes" Chryslers decision.

"We will continue to work positively and proactively with Chrysler and with other auto companies to partner in a fiscally responsible way to attract new investment, new jobs, and new product lines to Ontario," Hoskins said.

Tory Economic Development Critic Jane McKenna says while this is good news, it makes sense the automaker would pay its own way, given its posted 15 months of profits.

McKenna says the change of heart was likely because Chrysler still owes the money Ottawa and the province gave to it during the recession.

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Chrysler says it doesn't want to be involved in a game of political football, so it's withdrawing its requests for funding from both Queen's Park and Ottawa.

The automaker says it's using its own cash to keep up production at its Windsor and Brampton plants. It's a move that will keep 7600 jobs afloat for now.

The company had been asking for $700,000 from both levels of government to refurbish the plants.

In a statement, Chrysler says Windsor will be producing a new minivan for the company, while Brampton will continue to make Chrysler 300 and the Dodge Chargers and Challengers.

Earlier in the day, the finance minister was more than willing to offer up cash, in the form of a grant or loan.

When the news broke, Economic Development Minister Eric Hoskins issued a statement saying the province "welcomes" Chryslers decision.

"We will continue to work positively and proactively with Chrysler and with other auto companies to partner in a fiscally responsible way to attract new investment, new jobs, and new product lines to Ontario," Hoskins said.

Tory Economic Development Critic Jane McKenna says while this is good news, it makes sense the automaker would pay its own way, given its posted 15 months of profits.

McKenna says the change of heart was likely because Chrysler still owes the money Ottawa and the province gave to it during the recession.

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