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Can your kids read and write in cursive?
Catholic school board trying to reintroduce what appears to be a disappearing skill
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Can your kids write and read in cursive?

The Toronto Catholic District School Board thinks understanding and using cursive writing is a quickly disappearing skill and is looking into how cursive can be reintroduced in Toronto schools.

A school trustee tells the Toronto Star her own kids can't sign their own name or read a handwritten note.

Cursive writing is first mentioned in the provincial curriculum in Grade 3, but it is not required to be taught.

A government spokesperson tells the Star computer skills may get more of a focus from teachers, but boards are free to "increase the emphasis" on cursive writing.

A 17 year-old student in the Catholic board believes 20 percent of his classmates can't read cursive when his teacher uses it.

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  1. MichaelB_2952 posted on 03/14/2014 07:49 AM
    Teachers are not required to teach what is not listed in the curriculum. There is nothing in the curriculum which states that students must learn how to read and write using cursive.
  2. Leasa posted on 03/14/2014 08:46 AM
    I can't believe that this is an actual question. We stopped printing in grade two. How scary is this?
  3. HP posted on 03/14/2014 09:24 AM
    With the introduction of the keyboard for daily communication, writing, or even printing is no longer a required skill. I spend about 30% of my time in America, especially in the deep south and am always amazed by the number of young people, especially in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and Texas who can't read cursive and are unable to make change without a cash register. They're not functionally illiterate (well, some are) but no longer need the survival skills that Boomers and older people took for granted. In many states they no teach cursive, spelling, grammar, basic math and I see it as another step in the decline of the American civilization. How many of these kids will become CEO's?

    Sad to see that Canada is going down the same path. I was glad to see that during the Olympics, Russian, Chinese, and other athletes could interview in English...I wonder how many Canadians could do an interview in Russian or Chinese?
  4. Jack posted on 03/14/2014 04:44 PM
    My mother's cursive writing has been completely indecipherable to anyone but herself and my dad for decades, so clearly cursive writing doesn't make communication any simpler. And in this electronic age, the only things I ever write by hand are things that will be typed up later as an official copy or aren't important enough for anyone else to use.
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Can your kids write and read in cursive?

The Toronto Catholic District School Board thinks understanding and using cursive writing is a quickly disappearing skill and is looking into how cursive can be reintroduced in Toronto schools.

A school trustee tells the Toronto Star her own kids can't sign their own name or read a handwritten note.

Cursive writing is first mentioned in the provincial curriculum in Grade 3, but it is not required to be taught.

A government spokesperson tells the Star computer skills may get more of a focus from teachers, but boards are free to "increase the emphasis" on cursive writing.

A 17 year-old student in the Catholic board believes 20 percent of his classmates can't read cursive when his teacher uses it.

Leave a comment:

showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
  1. MichaelB_2952 posted on 03/14/2014 07:49 AM
    Teachers are not required to teach what is not listed in the curriculum. There is nothing in the curriculum which states that students must learn how to read and write using cursive.
  2. Leasa posted on 03/14/2014 08:46 AM
    I can't believe that this is an actual question. We stopped printing in grade two. How scary is this?
  3. HP posted on 03/14/2014 09:24 AM
    With the introduction of the keyboard for daily communication, writing, or even printing is no longer a required skill. I spend about 30% of my time in America, especially in the deep south and am always amazed by the number of young people, especially in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and Texas who can't read cursive and are unable to make change without a cash register. They're not functionally illiterate (well, some are) but no longer need the survival skills that Boomers and older people took for granted. In many states they no teach cursive, spelling, grammar, basic math and I see it as another step in the decline of the American civilization. How many of these kids will become CEO's?

    Sad to see that Canada is going down the same path. I was glad to see that during the Olympics, Russian, Chinese, and other athletes could interview in English...I wonder how many Canadians could do an interview in Russian or Chinese?
  4. Jack posted on 03/14/2014 04:44 PM
    My mother's cursive writing has been completely indecipherable to anyone but herself and my dad for decades, so clearly cursive writing doesn't make communication any simpler. And in this electronic age, the only things I ever write by hand are things that will be typed up later as an official copy or aren't important enough for anyone else to use.
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