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LISTEN: Hudak won't back down on gas plant allegations
PC leader unfazed by being served with libel notice
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Tim Hudak in Newstalk 1010 studios, April 6 2014
Tim Hudak/Twitter

Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak says he won't be backing down, despite receiving a libel notice from the Premier.

Hudak made the comments on Newstalk 1010's The Province, where he sat in the host's chair for the second time.

The focus of the show was jobs, but the first caller, Shirley from Ottawa, had something else in mind and asked Hudak point blank if he was going to step back from his accusations tied to deleting files in the gas plants scandal.

"No, we're not going to back down," said Hudak. "They're not going to silence us. We're not going to be part of the cover-up. We're going to hold them to account,'' Hudak told listeners.

Kathleen Wynne filed a libel notice against Hudak and his energy critic Lisa MacLeod after they alleged that she "oversaw and possibly ordered" deletion of gas plant emails. Wynne's spokesperson has called the claim "unfounded." A libel notice is the first step on the road to filing a defamation suit.

On Sunday, Hudak insisted the billion dollar cancellation leads directly to Wynne's office "whether she likes it or not", but stopped short of repeating the offensive lines.

Newstalk 1010 legal analyst Edward Prutschi Hudak's words were dangerously close to the line, especially based on what the Ontario Provincial Police has said at committee hearings.

"The indications at least at this early stage are that this is not  ultimately going to fall at the feet of Kathleen Wynne," he says. "At least at this point there isn't that level of personal responsibility."

That doesn't mean she has no political responsibility and that's where Hudak needs to focus. By not repeating his original statement, Hudak is playing it safer, while still doing what he has to as opposition leader.

"He is standing by the convictions and the general tone of the commentary albeit in what I think is, in a legal perspective, a wiser way to do it."

OPP who are investigating the scandal, have alleged in court documents that the boyfriend of a staffer was given access to government computers by David Livingston, Chief of Staff to former premier Dalton McGuinty.

 But Wynne insists no members of McGuinty's staff had access to the premier's office after she took over.

She has acknowledged that the tech-savvy boyfriend had separate contracts with the Liberal party and Liberal caucus.

Police say computer experts can't determine when 20 of 24 hard drives were accessed with a special password valid for weeks after Wynne was sworn in.

Livingston's lawyer has said his client did not break the law.

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Tim Hudak in Newstalk 1010 studios, April 6 2014
Tim Hudak/Twitter

Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak says he won't be backing down, despite receiving a libel notice from the Premier.

Hudak made the comments on Newstalk 1010's The Province, where he sat in the host's chair for the second time.

The focus of the show was jobs, but the first caller, Shirley from Ottawa, had something else in mind and asked Hudak point blank if he was going to step back from his accusations tied to deleting files in the gas plants scandal.

"No, we're not going to back down," said Hudak. "They're not going to silence us. We're not going to be part of the cover-up. We're going to hold them to account,'' Hudak told listeners.

Kathleen Wynne filed a libel notice against Hudak and his energy critic Lisa MacLeod after they alleged that she "oversaw and possibly ordered" deletion of gas plant emails. Wynne's spokesperson has called the claim "unfounded." A libel notice is the first step on the road to filing a defamation suit.

On Sunday, Hudak insisted the billion dollar cancellation leads directly to Wynne's office "whether she likes it or not", but stopped short of repeating the offensive lines.

Newstalk 1010 legal analyst Edward Prutschi Hudak's words were dangerously close to the line, especially based on what the Ontario Provincial Police has said at committee hearings.

"The indications at least at this early stage are that this is not  ultimately going to fall at the feet of Kathleen Wynne," he says. "At least at this point there isn't that level of personal responsibility."

That doesn't mean she has no political responsibility and that's where Hudak needs to focus. By not repeating his original statement, Hudak is playing it safer, while still doing what he has to as opposition leader.

"He is standing by the convictions and the general tone of the commentary albeit in what I think is, in a legal perspective, a wiser way to do it."

OPP who are investigating the scandal, have alleged in court documents that the boyfriend of a staffer was given access to government computers by David Livingston, Chief of Staff to former premier Dalton McGuinty.

 But Wynne insists no members of McGuinty's staff had access to the premier's office after she took over.

She has acknowledged that the tech-savvy boyfriend had separate contracts with the Liberal party and Liberal caucus.

Police say computer experts can't determine when 20 of 24 hard drives were accessed with a special password valid for weeks after Wynne was sworn in.

Livingston's lawyer has said his client did not break the law.

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