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Supreme Court rules on responsibility of employers to accommodate parents
A ruling from Canada's Supreme Court about the responsibility of employers to accommodate their workers
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Canada's Supreme Court (file photo)
Photo: CTV News

Another victory for parents who work outside the home and have child-care obligations but the battle may not be over yet.

You may recall the initial case 4 years ago, when a Federal human rights tribunal ruled employers in Canada must try to accommodate parents who are juggling work with child-care.

Ottawa appealed and now the Federal Court of Appeal has upheld the original decision.

This is the story of Fiona Johnstone and her husband who, 10 years ago, were working full-time for the Canada Border Services Agency at Pearson Airport.  

A full-time position meant rotating shifts with irregular hours and that made it impossible for the Johnstone's to get regular child-care.

Mrs. Johnstone went to her employer and even offered to work part-time because they were the only predictable shifts.  

She took the part-time job and filed a human rights complaint.

Johnstone is thrilled the Court of Appeal has sided with her but says "the ruling is important to other families who will be increasingly faced by this int he workplace."

Meanwhile Ottawa is now mulling over whether to try to take this to the Supreme Court of Canada on the basis that child-care responsibilities are the result of personal choice and should not impose a "duty to accomodate."

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20 0
Canada's Supreme Court (file photo)
Photo: CTV News

Another victory for parents who work outside the home and have child-care obligations but the battle may not be over yet.

You may recall the initial case 4 years ago, when a Federal human rights tribunal ruled employers in Canada must try to accommodate parents who are juggling work with child-care.

Ottawa appealed and now the Federal Court of Appeal has upheld the original decision.

This is the story of Fiona Johnstone and her husband who, 10 years ago, were working full-time for the Canada Border Services Agency at Pearson Airport.  

A full-time position meant rotating shifts with irregular hours and that made it impossible for the Johnstone's to get regular child-care.

Mrs. Johnstone went to her employer and even offered to work part-time because they were the only predictable shifts.  

She took the part-time job and filed a human rights complaint.

Johnstone is thrilled the Court of Appeal has sided with her but says "the ruling is important to other families who will be increasingly faced by this int he workplace."

Meanwhile Ottawa is now mulling over whether to try to take this to the Supreme Court of Canada on the basis that child-care responsibilities are the result of personal choice and should not impose a "duty to accomodate."

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