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Toronto Police Want Help Catching Perp
Police say 63-year-old man was knocked to the ground by thief.
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    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed vitae mollis tellus

    Courtesy for Rey Mena

      Toronto Police are hoping you can help catch the man accused of shoving an elderly man to the ground and ripping the chain from his neck.

      It happened on Monday, May 5th at around 5p.m. in the Bridletowne Circle area near Warden and Finch Avenue East. 

      Police say a 63-year-old man was approached from behind and knocked to the ground.  That’s when the suspect reached in and ripped the chain from the man’s neck. 

      The suspect is described as a dark-skinned black man, 18-25 years of age, 5’8”-6’0”, wearing dark pants, a dark-coloured Adidas hoodie with a white Adidas symbol on the back of the hood.  The suspect was also wearing white shoes with dark soles.

      Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-4206, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS(8477), or online at www.222tips.com

      Leave a comment:

      showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
      1. Frankie posted on 05/09/2014 05:08 PM
        Push this scumbag onto subway tracks while taking his chains away so he never assaults anyone again.
      2. AnI posted on 02/07/2015 01:06 PM
        Herry - a little information for you to process:

        Criminal Code of Canada
        Sections 318 and 319 of the Criminal Code make it a criminal offence to advocate genocide, publicly incite hatred, and willfully promote hatred against an “identifiable group.”
        An identifiable group is defined as any section of the public distinguished by colour, race, religion, ethnic origin, or sexual orientation.
        The Code provisions are intended to prohibit the public distribution of hate propaganda. Private speech is not covered by the provisions: the act of promoting hatred can only be committed by communicating statements other than in a private conversation, and inciting hatred is only prohibited if statements are communicated in a public place. Online communications that advocate genocide or willfully promote or incite hatred are likely to fall within the provisions because the Internet is a public network.

        Canada's hate speech laws upheld by Supreme Court
        Canada’s human rights hate speech laws are a constitutionally valid limit on freedom of expression, the Supreme Court has unanimously ruled in a landmark judgment.
        The judgment in the case of William Whatcott of Saskatchewan reaffirms the Canadian approach to hate speech, that it can be limited by law to address the problem of hate speech, unlike the American approach, in which speech cannot be limited except in the most extreme circumstances.
        In upholding a definition of hatred first crafted by the Supreme Court in 1991, the current justices ruled that the hate speech section of Saskatchewan’s Human Rights Code addresses a pressing and substantial issue, and is proportional to its objective of “tackling causes of discriminatory activity to reduce the harmful effects and social costs of discrimination.”

        SO- I would postulate that if a person of colour would decide they are offended by your posts, and a complaint made first to CRTC then - Human Rights? you just may have a problem.

        Of course, this is only conjuncture on my part - and - worry this one - you better have used a PROXY each time you come online here, use a PROXY email adress to start here....lol. - I doubt you did...
      showing all comments

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      2 1

        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed vitae mollis tellus

        Courtesy for Rey Mena

          Toronto Police are hoping you can help catch the man accused of shoving an elderly man to the ground and ripping the chain from his neck.

          It happened on Monday, May 5th at around 5p.m. in the Bridletowne Circle area near Warden and Finch Avenue East. 

          Police say a 63-year-old man was approached from behind and knocked to the ground.  That’s when the suspect reached in and ripped the chain from the man’s neck. 

          The suspect is described as a dark-skinned black man, 18-25 years of age, 5’8”-6’0”, wearing dark pants, a dark-coloured Adidas hoodie with a white Adidas symbol on the back of the hood.  The suspect was also wearing white shoes with dark soles.

          Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-4206, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS(8477), or online at www.222tips.com

          Leave a comment:

          showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
          1. Frankie posted on 05/09/2014 05:08 PM
            Push this scumbag onto subway tracks while taking his chains away so he never assaults anyone again.
          2. AnI posted on 02/07/2015 01:06 PM
            Herry - a little information for you to process:

            Criminal Code of Canada
            Sections 318 and 319 of the Criminal Code make it a criminal offence to advocate genocide, publicly incite hatred, and willfully promote hatred against an “identifiable group.”
            An identifiable group is defined as any section of the public distinguished by colour, race, religion, ethnic origin, or sexual orientation.
            The Code provisions are intended to prohibit the public distribution of hate propaganda. Private speech is not covered by the provisions: the act of promoting hatred can only be committed by communicating statements other than in a private conversation, and inciting hatred is only prohibited if statements are communicated in a public place. Online communications that advocate genocide or willfully promote or incite hatred are likely to fall within the provisions because the Internet is a public network.

            Canada's hate speech laws upheld by Supreme Court
            Canada’s human rights hate speech laws are a constitutionally valid limit on freedom of expression, the Supreme Court has unanimously ruled in a landmark judgment.
            The judgment in the case of William Whatcott of Saskatchewan reaffirms the Canadian approach to hate speech, that it can be limited by law to address the problem of hate speech, unlike the American approach, in which speech cannot be limited except in the most extreme circumstances.
            In upholding a definition of hatred first crafted by the Supreme Court in 1991, the current justices ruled that the hate speech section of Saskatchewan’s Human Rights Code addresses a pressing and substantial issue, and is proportional to its objective of “tackling causes of discriminatory activity to reduce the harmful effects and social costs of discrimination.”

            SO- I would postulate that if a person of colour would decide they are offended by your posts, and a complaint made first to CRTC then - Human Rights? you just may have a problem.

            Of course, this is only conjuncture on my part - and - worry this one - you better have used a PROXY each time you come online here, use a PROXY email adress to start here....lol. - I doubt you did...
          showing all comments

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