NEWS
 
Study casts doubt on potential health benefits of red wine compound
New research finds resveratrol might not be as good for you as previous studies suggest
2 0
Resveratrol is found in things like red wine, chocolate, and some vegetables
Photo: chefsblade.monster.com

For a few years now, there's been a lot of hype about the chemical compound resveratrol, which can be found in red wine, dark chocolate, berries and certain vegetables.   

Some experts said resveratrol contained potent anti-oxidants which reduce inflammation and therefore could lower the risk of several diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

At Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Professor Richard Semba and his team decided to take a closer look.  

They tracked the health of about 800 people living in the Tuscany region of Italy for nearly 9 years.

These were people who were at least 65 years old when the study began.

What they found was resveratrol did nothing.  

It did nothing to substantially influence inflammation, cardiovascular disease, cancer or longevity.

Professor Semba's conclusion, is that "the story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn't stand the test of time."

Categories:

DON'T MISS

TED RADIO HOUR

Welcome to TED Radio Hour hosted by Guy Raz, Saturdays at 6pm and Sundays at 7pm

 
2 0
Resveratrol is found in things like red wine, chocolate, and some vegetables
Photo: chefsblade.monster.com

For a few years now, there's been a lot of hype about the chemical compound resveratrol, which can be found in red wine, dark chocolate, berries and certain vegetables.   

Some experts said resveratrol contained potent anti-oxidants which reduce inflammation and therefore could lower the risk of several diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

At Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Professor Richard Semba and his team decided to take a closer look.  

They tracked the health of about 800 people living in the Tuscany region of Italy for nearly 9 years.

These were people who were at least 65 years old when the study began.

What they found was resveratrol did nothing.  

It did nothing to substantially influence inflammation, cardiovascular disease, cancer or longevity.

Professor Semba's conclusion, is that "the story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn't stand the test of time."

Top stories

A provincial backbencher is trying to outlaw the computers that get the good tickets first