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Civil liberties group to argue for right to die
Case goes to Supreme Court of Canada Oct 14
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A B.C. civil liberties group has filed their written argument against an appeal court decision upholding the country's ban on assisted suicide.

Grace Pastine of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association says the organization will argue before the Supreme Court of Canada that assisted suicide should be legal on behalf of the families of people who wanted to die with dignity.

Lee Carter, the plaintiff whose mother received a doctor-assisted suicide in Switzerland, says that Canadians suffering from chronic, debilitating conditions should not have to travel elsewhere to end their pain.

Anne Fomenoff, the mother of deceased high-profile plaintiff Gloria Taylor, says that her family will continue to fight for the right to a dignified death to honour her daughter's memory.

The B.C. Civil Liberties Association will be presenting its case in court on Oct. 14.

Last October, the B.C. Court of Appeal overturned a 2012 decision by the B.C. Supreme Court ruling that the existing law banning assisted suicide was unconstitutional and that Taylor be granted an exemption to the law that would allow her to seek assisted death.

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  1. john posted on 05/21/2014 02:15 PM
    as somone who watched my grandma go form ruing around like a marathon runner to not able to move her hand to wipe her ass i can see how it would be a good thing .
    1. Jack posted on 05/21/2014 02:24 PM
      @john Agreed. I saw my grandfather go from an active, vibrant human being to a shambling muttering husk thanks to Alzheimers. If I ever came down with the same fate, I want to know I can trust my loved ones to put me out of my misery (and out of theirs) and trust the government not to condemn them for it.
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2 0

A B.C. civil liberties group has filed their written argument against an appeal court decision upholding the country's ban on assisted suicide.

Grace Pastine of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association says the organization will argue before the Supreme Court of Canada that assisted suicide should be legal on behalf of the families of people who wanted to die with dignity.

Lee Carter, the plaintiff whose mother received a doctor-assisted suicide in Switzerland, says that Canadians suffering from chronic, debilitating conditions should not have to travel elsewhere to end their pain.

Anne Fomenoff, the mother of deceased high-profile plaintiff Gloria Taylor, says that her family will continue to fight for the right to a dignified death to honour her daughter's memory.

The B.C. Civil Liberties Association will be presenting its case in court on Oct. 14.

Last October, the B.C. Court of Appeal overturned a 2012 decision by the B.C. Supreme Court ruling that the existing law banning assisted suicide was unconstitutional and that Taylor be granted an exemption to the law that would allow her to seek assisted death.

Leave a comment:

showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
  1. john posted on 05/21/2014 02:15 PM
    as somone who watched my grandma go form ruing around like a marathon runner to not able to move her hand to wipe her ass i can see how it would be a good thing .
    1. Jack posted on 05/21/2014 02:24 PM
      @john Agreed. I saw my grandfather go from an active, vibrant human being to a shambling muttering husk thanks to Alzheimers. If I ever came down with the same fate, I want to know I can trust my loved ones to put me out of my misery (and out of theirs) and trust the government not to condemn them for it.
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