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WATCH: NDP platform promises new spending and claims new revenue and savings
Party releases plan three weeks into campaign
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NDP leader Andrea Horwath released her party's election campaign platform on Thursday
Photo: Katie Franzios/NEWSTALK 1010

The NDP call it a "Plan That Makes Sense." The party released it's 11-page platform today outlining $1.8 billion in new spending in its first year in government leading up to $2.8 billion in 2017-18. 

But it counters that with new revenue and savings, vowing to balance the budget by 2017-18. The party says it can get a $842 million surplus by then.

The NDP has a different approach in tackling traffic. While echoing a Liberal promise of a 10-year, $29 billion public transit fund, the party also wants to widen a 60km stretch of highway each year.

The highway project would cost $250 million a year for four years, with half of that construction in Northern Ontario.

The NDP also wants to boost public transit investment by $250 million annually for priority transit projects like the Downtown Relief Line in Toronto and year-round GO train service to the Niagara area. They would hike corporate taxes to pay for transit.

Leader Andrea Horwath also wants to spend $40 million to buy 200 more snow plies and sand trucks for the roads.

The NDP will give a $1,275 Caregiver tax credit to help those who are primary caregivers to families caring for sick or elderly loved ones. They also vow to eliminate wait lists for long-term care beds and put in place a five-day homecare waittime guarantee.

The party has vowed to take HST off of home hydro bills - saving the average family $120 each year. They have also committed to their 2013 budget demand to lower car insurance rates by 15 per cent, with plans to make how your rate is set more transparent.

The platform says it would give the Ontario Energy Board the power to minimize impact on rising natural gas prices, preventing what it calls "unfair price increases."

The NDP want to freeze post-secondary tuition costs to 2014 levels and keep in place the Liberals 30 per cent tuition grant which some are eligible.

They also want to hire 1,000 more gym teachers to get your kids moving.

When it comes to pensions, the party wants to expand the Canada Pension Plan. However, if after next year's federal election they see that's not possible, Ontario's NDP will look into a provincial pension plan.

The party claims a new Minister of Savings and Accountability could save up to $600 million annually.

A contingency fund has been built into the platform each year, hovering around $800-$900 million each year. The party says it can use it for deficit or debt repayment if need be.

As Premier, Horwath would rejig promised budget funding in the education and healthcare sectors, as well as jobs programs, claiming savings of $935 million in her first year in government.

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14 0
NDP leader Andrea Horwath released her party's election campaign platform on Thursday
Photo: Katie Franzios/NEWSTALK 1010

The NDP call it a "Plan That Makes Sense." The party released it's 11-page platform today outlining $1.8 billion in new spending in its first year in government leading up to $2.8 billion in 2017-18. 

But it counters that with new revenue and savings, vowing to balance the budget by 2017-18. The party says it can get a $842 million surplus by then.

The NDP has a different approach in tackling traffic. While echoing a Liberal promise of a 10-year, $29 billion public transit fund, the party also wants to widen a 60km stretch of highway each year.

The highway project would cost $250 million a year for four years, with half of that construction in Northern Ontario.

The NDP also wants to boost public transit investment by $250 million annually for priority transit projects like the Downtown Relief Line in Toronto and year-round GO train service to the Niagara area. They would hike corporate taxes to pay for transit.

Leader Andrea Horwath also wants to spend $40 million to buy 200 more snow plies and sand trucks for the roads.

The NDP will give a $1,275 Caregiver tax credit to help those who are primary caregivers to families caring for sick or elderly loved ones. They also vow to eliminate wait lists for long-term care beds and put in place a five-day homecare waittime guarantee.

The party has vowed to take HST off of home hydro bills - saving the average family $120 each year. They have also committed to their 2013 budget demand to lower car insurance rates by 15 per cent, with plans to make how your rate is set more transparent.

The platform says it would give the Ontario Energy Board the power to minimize impact on rising natural gas prices, preventing what it calls "unfair price increases."

The NDP want to freeze post-secondary tuition costs to 2014 levels and keep in place the Liberals 30 per cent tuition grant which some are eligible.

They also want to hire 1,000 more gym teachers to get your kids moving.

When it comes to pensions, the party wants to expand the Canada Pension Plan. However, if after next year's federal election they see that's not possible, Ontario's NDP will look into a provincial pension plan.

The party claims a new Minister of Savings and Accountability could save up to $600 million annually.

A contingency fund has been built into the platform each year, hovering around $800-$900 million each year. The party says it can use it for deficit or debt repayment if need be.

As Premier, Horwath would rejig promised budget funding in the education and healthcare sectors, as well as jobs programs, claiming savings of $935 million in her first year in government.

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