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Knowlton Nash dies at 86
The tributes are flooding in for the true icon of Canadian journalism.
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The tributes are flooding in for a true icon of Canadian journalism.
    
Knowlton Nash, the veteran CBC broadcaster, died last night at his home in Toronto at the age of 86.
    
He had reportedly been battling Parkinson's for some years.
    
Nash had a 37-year career with Canada's public broadcaster, including a decade spent at the anchor desk of The National, the CBC's flagship news program.
    
It was there that his steady, easy-going style and earnest, scholarly delivery earned the broadcaster with the big glasses the unofficial title of Uncle Knowlty.
    
In 1988 Nash passed the anchor torch to Peter Mansbridge, who expressed his deep respect, admiration and fondness for the man he called a mentor.
    
As a reporter Nash covered many of the events that helped shape the 20th century, including the Vietnam War, the Cuban missile crisis, the assassination of the Kennedys and Watergate.
    
Behind the scenes as a manager at the C-B-C, he was at the forefront of changes like going from black and white to colour television and shifting from film to electronic news gathering.
    
Nash also wrote several books, including two about his long and storied career - History on the Run in 1984 and Prime Time At Ten in 1987.

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The tributes are flooding in for a true icon of Canadian journalism.
    
Knowlton Nash, the veteran CBC broadcaster, died last night at his home in Toronto at the age of 86.
    
He had reportedly been battling Parkinson's for some years.
    
Nash had a 37-year career with Canada's public broadcaster, including a decade spent at the anchor desk of The National, the CBC's flagship news program.
    
It was there that his steady, easy-going style and earnest, scholarly delivery earned the broadcaster with the big glasses the unofficial title of Uncle Knowlty.
    
In 1988 Nash passed the anchor torch to Peter Mansbridge, who expressed his deep respect, admiration and fondness for the man he called a mentor.
    
As a reporter Nash covered many of the events that helped shape the 20th century, including the Vietnam War, the Cuban missile crisis, the assassination of the Kennedys and Watergate.
    
Behind the scenes as a manager at the C-B-C, he was at the forefront of changes like going from black and white to colour television and shifting from film to electronic news gathering.
    
Nash also wrote several books, including two about his long and storied career - History on the Run in 1984 and Prime Time At Ten in 1987.

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