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Harper government pushes ahead with controversial police powers legislation
Bill C-13 is a cyberbullying law but also has clauses to expand the power of various government officials to monitor cellphones and other electronic data
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Critics of Bill C-13 claim it allows phone companies could voluntarily hand over certain information about their subscribers to police
Photo: James Moore/NEWSTALK 1010

Despite the objections of the privacy commissioners of Ontario and British Columbia, the Harper Government is forging ahead with two pieces of legislation the propose new powers for police to monitor the private data of Canadians.

Bill C-13 is a cyberbullying law but also has clauses to expand the power of various government officials to monitor cellphones and other electronic data.  

Most of the time, officials would first need a warrant from a judge.  

Critics say the bill also allows law-enforcement to seek private information from phone companies, meaning those companies could voluntarily hand over certain information about their subscribers to police, border guards, and others.

Ontario Privacy Commissioner, Dr. Ann Cavoukian says Bill C-13 is "a wolf in sheep's clothing."  

In her words, "what we have to get away from is this trust-me model - 'just trust us, we're the government, we're doing the right thing, we're in it to protect you.'"  

Cavoukian says, "it's just unacceptable."

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23 0
Critics of Bill C-13 claim it allows phone companies could voluntarily hand over certain information about their subscribers to police
Photo: James Moore/NEWSTALK 1010

Despite the objections of the privacy commissioners of Ontario and British Columbia, the Harper Government is forging ahead with two pieces of legislation the propose new powers for police to monitor the private data of Canadians.

Bill C-13 is a cyberbullying law but also has clauses to expand the power of various government officials to monitor cellphones and other electronic data.  

Most of the time, officials would first need a warrant from a judge.  

Critics say the bill also allows law-enforcement to seek private information from phone companies, meaning those companies could voluntarily hand over certain information about their subscribers to police, border guards, and others.

Ontario Privacy Commissioner, Dr. Ann Cavoukian says Bill C-13 is "a wolf in sheep's clothing."  

In her words, "what we have to get away from is this trust-me model - 'just trust us, we're the government, we're doing the right thing, we're in it to protect you.'"  

Cavoukian says, "it's just unacceptable."

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The zoo is investigating.