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Government releases satellite tracking data of missing flight MH370
47 pages of raw satellite data used to conclude that the missing Malaysia Airlines jet crashed into the southern Indian Ocean, was released Tuesday.
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The Malaysian government has released 47 pages of raw satellite data used to conclude that the missing Malaysia Airlines jet crashed into the southern Indian Ocean.

Some family members of the 239 people on board have been demanding Malaysia release the data so that independent experts can verify it.

An international investigation team led by Malaysia has concluded that it flew south after it was last spotted on Malaysian military radar about 90 minutes after takeoff and ended up in the southern Indian Ocean off Australia. This is based on complex calculations derived in part from hourly transmissions between the plane and a communications satellite.

Some family members who have been critical of the Malaysian government's handling of the incident say they want independent experts to review the data. Several experts in physics, satellite technology and mathematics have said that based on the information released so far they have been unable to verify the investigation team's conclusions.

The Associated Press is asking experts to review the technical data, which was released Tuesday to family members and then to the media.

The plane left Kuala Lumpur on March 8 en route to Beijing. An ongoing search effort in the southern Indian Ocean has found no trace of the plane.

The Malaysian government made several statement about the plane that were later proven to be false or contradictory, fuelling a perception that it was incompetent or (in some quarters) covering up what happened. The government insists it is being transparent in what has been an unprecedented incident.

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The Malaysian government has released 47 pages of raw satellite data used to conclude that the missing Malaysia Airlines jet crashed into the southern Indian Ocean.

Some family members of the 239 people on board have been demanding Malaysia release the data so that independent experts can verify it.

An international investigation team led by Malaysia has concluded that it flew south after it was last spotted on Malaysian military radar about 90 minutes after takeoff and ended up in the southern Indian Ocean off Australia. This is based on complex calculations derived in part from hourly transmissions between the plane and a communications satellite.

Some family members who have been critical of the Malaysian government's handling of the incident say they want independent experts to review the data. Several experts in physics, satellite technology and mathematics have said that based on the information released so far they have been unable to verify the investigation team's conclusions.

The Associated Press is asking experts to review the technical data, which was released Tuesday to family members and then to the media.

The plane left Kuala Lumpur on March 8 en route to Beijing. An ongoing search effort in the southern Indian Ocean has found no trace of the plane.

The Malaysian government made several statement about the plane that were later proven to be false or contradictory, fuelling a perception that it was incompetent or (in some quarters) covering up what happened. The government insists it is being transparent in what has been an unprecedented incident.

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