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Flame retardant material linked to child learning disorders

The study found a 4.5 drop in IQ and greater hyperactivity in five-year-olds

A researcher at B-C's Simon Fraser University says the findings of a new study linking chemicals and learning disabilities in children should be taken seriously by the federal government.

The study concludes that when a pregnant woman is exposed to flame retardants, her child may be more likely to experience hyperactivity and other learning disorders.

Health sciences professor Bruce Lanphear says much more caution must be taken around allowing pregnant women to be exposed to certain chemicals. Lanphear says that in the short term, parents should consider removing old couches and carpets made with flame retardant from their homes and offices. But he thinks it's time for a long-term solution.

Lanphear worries that even if specific chemicals are phased out, without proper testing regulations it's possible new man-made chemicals with unknown side effects could be used instead.

The study, published online Wednesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, found a 4.5 drop in IQ and greater hyperactivity in five-year-olds was associated with their mother's exposure to flame retardants during early pregnancy and after the babies were born.

The research joins five other international studies highlighting the potential dangers of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, known as PDBEs, which were once widely used in products like couches, carpets and car seats.

The study started 10 years ago as realization donned that chemical compounds throughout the consumer market had little research answering questions about their safety. The researchers tested blood, urine and hair samples of 309 women and their children in Cincinnati, Ohio, starting from 16 weeks of pregnancy and until their children were five.

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  1. Mark posted on 05/29/2014 08:00 AM
    Maybe, maybe, maybe.

    Maybe IQ levels will improve when we get better teachers in Canada. As it is, all across this country, crappy incompetent teachers stay in their jobs because there is no way to get rid of them. How liberalish we are - as we bumble on - paying the most for little in return.
    1. Anthony posted on 05/29/2014 10:11 AM
      @Mark Sad for our country that you think so. I know otherwise and can say with authority that Canadian teachers are some of the best trained and most effective in the world. Our standardized testing proves that.

      Furthermore, ineffective teachers are removed often. You just don't read about that. It's far harder to get rid of an ineffective doctor.
    2. Barrie posted on 05/29/2014 10:23 AM
      @Mark This article was about chemicals nothing to do with teachers!
    3. john posted on 05/29/2014 12:43 PM
      @Barrie and the deference is ?
  2. Bruce Borowski posted on 05/29/2014 11:27 AM
    Maybe that's what the government wants is a land of lab rats who are retarded and obey their every command
  3. john posted on 05/29/2014 12:38 PM
    maybe this is why people keep voting liberal same with the lead in the water .
    1. Herry posted on 05/29/2014 01:03 PM
      @john Sure john, you can put harpers cxxk back in your yap now !
    2. john posted on 05/29/2014 02:35 PM
      @Herry is that Justin turdos c%$$%k in your month . just asking cause i know u love to lick is b@#$@ls sack and give him a BJ . while i am banging his wlfe .
    3. john posted on 05/29/2014 03:38 PM
      @Herry oh and dont take in the white stuff . i hear it makes u pregnant .
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