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Poll Shows 4 in 10 Ontarians Still Undecided
38% say they will make up their mind about how to vote after Tuesday night’s debate.
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A new poll conducted by Ispos-Reid on behalf of Newstalk 1010’s broadcasting partners CTV News and CP24 shows that many Ontarians still don’t know how they will vote come election day on June 12th.

Four in 10 (38%) of those asked say they will make the decision following Tuesday night’s leader debate.

“We still have a lot of people who have yet to make up their mind and they’re going to do so in the back half of the campaign, after the leaders debate.  What’s important is that the leaders’ debate could influence up to 38% of people who are going to watch the debate and then decide.” said Ipsos Reid Senior Vice President John Wright.

Wright says this poll shows that debates matter, especially considering that 21% of those who said they had already made up their mind before the election was called say they could be swayed to support another political party by the end of the campaign. 

Liberal (32%) and NDP (28%) supporters were most likely to say that they decision could change, meaning some supporters could switch to the other team if they feel it’s the best way to defeat Tim Hudak.  However, the Progressive Conservative leader appears to have the strongest, steadiest base of support with 61% of PC supporters saying they’ve made up their mind and nothing is going to change their decision.  Compare that to only 41% of Liberals and 41% of New Democrats who say the same.

“It shows that Tim Hudak is in the best position going into this debate because his supporters have already made up their minds they don’t need to see or hear anything more from him.  What it’s saying to me is that the Liberal vote is still very and this is important for Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals to get the vote out.” said Wright.

The poll also found that residents in Toronto are most likely to consider shifting their support elsewhere with 31% saying they had a party in mind, but could be swayed.   

Tuesday’s debate begins at 6:30p.m.

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A new poll conducted by Ispos-Reid on behalf of Newstalk 1010’s broadcasting partners CTV News and CP24 shows that many Ontarians still don’t know how they will vote come election day on June 12th.

Four in 10 (38%) of those asked say they will make the decision following Tuesday night’s leader debate.

“We still have a lot of people who have yet to make up their mind and they’re going to do so in the back half of the campaign, after the leaders debate.  What’s important is that the leaders’ debate could influence up to 38% of people who are going to watch the debate and then decide.” said Ipsos Reid Senior Vice President John Wright.

Wright says this poll shows that debates matter, especially considering that 21% of those who said they had already made up their mind before the election was called say they could be swayed to support another political party by the end of the campaign. 

Liberal (32%) and NDP (28%) supporters were most likely to say that they decision could change, meaning some supporters could switch to the other team if they feel it’s the best way to defeat Tim Hudak.  However, the Progressive Conservative leader appears to have the strongest, steadiest base of support with 61% of PC supporters saying they’ve made up their mind and nothing is going to change their decision.  Compare that to only 41% of Liberals and 41% of New Democrats who say the same.

“It shows that Tim Hudak is in the best position going into this debate because his supporters have already made up their minds they don’t need to see or hear anything more from him.  What it’s saying to me is that the Liberal vote is still very and this is important for Kathleen Wynne and the Liberals to get the vote out.” said Wright.

The poll also found that residents in Toronto are most likely to consider shifting their support elsewhere with 31% saying they had a party in mind, but could be swayed.   

Tuesday’s debate begins at 6:30p.m.

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