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UPDATE: Questions raised about safety of Brampton townhouse complex
Fund set up to help family of child killed pay for funeral
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Questions about the safety of a Brampton townhouse complex have been raised in the wake of a tragic fire over the weekend.

A 10-year-old boy, identified as 10-year-old Nicolas Gabriel, died in a townhouse complex fire on Sunday near Kennedy and Queen.

The boy's body was found after the fire was extinguished. He was visiting for a sleepover.

Eighty to 100 people have lost their homes and nearly all of their possessions after the fire broke out on Ardglen Avenue around 3:15 Sunday morning. Eighteen units were destroyed in total.

As many as 300 people were initially evacuated for safety reasons.

On Moore in the Morning Monday there were concerns raised about the conditions of the townhouse complex.

"If you drive past you can just clearly see the places are poorly taken care of," Pastor Jamie Holtom of the North Bramalea United Church told Moore in the Morning. "(The units) are not being supported as far as the physicality of the places."

Resident Wendy Gibson told the Globe and Mail Monday morning that the fire alarms were inadequate.

"I was hearing people talking - they couldn't even hear the fire alarms at their house," Gibson told the Globe. "They should be inside every house, and they don't take care of this place."

Fire officials said a townhouse unit was engulfed in flames and the fire spread “very quickly” to other units.

A Deputy fire chief confirmed the fire began in the kitchen of one unit while the tennant was cooking, then quickly spread from roof to roof. 

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell says the city is working with the residents who have lost their homes, ensuring they're equipped with the essentials and provided with a place to stay.  The local community center has also opened its doors.  

The website www.regenbrampton.com is accepting cash donations on behalf of the victims.

The Fire Marshall is investigating.

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Questions about the safety of a Brampton townhouse complex have been raised in the wake of a tragic fire over the weekend.

A 10-year-old boy, identified as 10-year-old Nicolas Gabriel, died in a townhouse complex fire on Sunday near Kennedy and Queen.

The boy's body was found after the fire was extinguished. He was visiting for a sleepover.

Eighty to 100 people have lost their homes and nearly all of their possessions after the fire broke out on Ardglen Avenue around 3:15 Sunday morning. Eighteen units were destroyed in total.

As many as 300 people were initially evacuated for safety reasons.

On Moore in the Morning Monday there were concerns raised about the conditions of the townhouse complex.

"If you drive past you can just clearly see the places are poorly taken care of," Pastor Jamie Holtom of the North Bramalea United Church told Moore in the Morning. "(The units) are not being supported as far as the physicality of the places."

Resident Wendy Gibson told the Globe and Mail Monday morning that the fire alarms were inadequate.

"I was hearing people talking - they couldn't even hear the fire alarms at their house," Gibson told the Globe. "They should be inside every house, and they don't take care of this place."

Fire officials said a townhouse unit was engulfed in flames and the fire spread “very quickly” to other units.

A Deputy fire chief confirmed the fire began in the kitchen of one unit while the tennant was cooking, then quickly spread from roof to roof. 

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell says the city is working with the residents who have lost their homes, ensuring they're equipped with the essentials and provided with a place to stay.  The local community center has also opened its doors.  

The website www.regenbrampton.com is accepting cash donations on behalf of the victims.

The Fire Marshall is investigating.

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