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Don Valley West: Will Wynne keep her seat?
Tories hope to paint the riding blue, like they did federally
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It's decision day and that means voters across the province will be headed to the polls starting at 9am.

And with Kathleen Wynne vying to keep her job as premier, it would also be beneficial for her to keep her seat in Don Valley West so she could be a part of proceedings at the legislature.

It's a riding she's represented for 10 and a half years. She hasn't spent much time campaigning there, but she says when she isn't in her home base, she's keeping in touch with volunteers to see how the ground game is going.

Wynne left the Tory candidate in the dust in 2011, doubling the amount of votes the Progressive Conservative candidate received with over 24,000.

However, federally, the riding went from Liberal to Conservative that same year.

McMaster University political science professor Henry Jacek says that's because of Michael Ignatieff, who he says could have been the worst leader the Canadian wing of the party has ever had. He says the dislike of him cased many MPs to lose their seats on Parliament Hill.  

Looking east to Quebec, two premiers in a row not only had their parties lose their government but they also lost their seats. Jacek says things are different here. In Quebec, he says voters wanted to get rid of party leaders. He says the Ontario Liberals got rid of Dalton McGuinty, so Kathleen Wynne may be just enough of a change to keep the party in power.

The man who wants to replace Wynne is Tory candidate David Porter. He claims, it's time for a change in Don Valley West. But he does offer it's a huge task since Wynne is well-liked in the area.

If the the Premier loses her seat and keeps her job, she'll likely call a by-election to be able to sit in the legislature during proceedings. However, Jacek says it's unlikely the public will elect a government but not the leader of that party.

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It's decision day and that means voters across the province will be headed to the polls starting at 9am.

And with Kathleen Wynne vying to keep her job as premier, it would also be beneficial for her to keep her seat in Don Valley West so she could be a part of proceedings at the legislature.

It's a riding she's represented for 10 and a half years. She hasn't spent much time campaigning there, but she says when she isn't in her home base, she's keeping in touch with volunteers to see how the ground game is going.

Wynne left the Tory candidate in the dust in 2011, doubling the amount of votes the Progressive Conservative candidate received with over 24,000.

However, federally, the riding went from Liberal to Conservative that same year.

McMaster University political science professor Henry Jacek says that's because of Michael Ignatieff, who he says could have been the worst leader the Canadian wing of the party has ever had. He says the dislike of him cased many MPs to lose their seats on Parliament Hill.  

Looking east to Quebec, two premiers in a row not only had their parties lose their government but they also lost their seats. Jacek says things are different here. In Quebec, he says voters wanted to get rid of party leaders. He says the Ontario Liberals got rid of Dalton McGuinty, so Kathleen Wynne may be just enough of a change to keep the party in power.

The man who wants to replace Wynne is Tory candidate David Porter. He claims, it's time for a change in Don Valley West. But he does offer it's a huge task since Wynne is well-liked in the area.

If the the Premier loses her seat and keeps her job, she'll likely call a by-election to be able to sit in the legislature during proceedings. However, Jacek says it's unlikely the public will elect a government but not the leader of that party.

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