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Distracted driving blitz kicks off
Toronto and York Regional police are teaming up to crack down on distracted drivers
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It's been illegal in the province of Ontario for the past five years, but GTA drivers still aren't getting the message.

Toronto and York Regional police are taking part in a 6-week distracted driving initiative in conjunction with CAA South Central Ontario.

The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness regarding high-risk behaviours behind the wheel, and urge you to focus on the road.

The blitz was launched near Steeles Avenue East and Don Mills Road this morning.

Plain clothes officers flagged down any drivers breaking the law while stopped at a red light. 

Ontario's ban on hand-held devices has been in effect since October 2009. The law makes it is illegal for motorists to talk, text, type, dial or email using hand-held cell phones and other hand-held communication and entertainment devices. The use of hands-free devices is still permitted. Breaking that law, can result in a fine of $280.

Studies show that a driver using a cell phone is four times more likely to get into an collision than a driver focused on the road. Other studies show that dialing and texting carries the highest degree of risk of all cell phone-related activities, with motorists who text being 23 times more likely to have a collision. Teens and adults under 35 are the most frequent users of cell phones while driving.

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4 0

It's been illegal in the province of Ontario for the past five years, but GTA drivers still aren't getting the message.

Toronto and York Regional police are taking part in a 6-week distracted driving initiative in conjunction with CAA South Central Ontario.

The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness regarding high-risk behaviours behind the wheel, and urge you to focus on the road.

The blitz was launched near Steeles Avenue East and Don Mills Road this morning.

Plain clothes officers flagged down any drivers breaking the law while stopped at a red light. 

Ontario's ban on hand-held devices has been in effect since October 2009. The law makes it is illegal for motorists to talk, text, type, dial or email using hand-held cell phones and other hand-held communication and entertainment devices. The use of hands-free devices is still permitted. Breaking that law, can result in a fine of $280.

Studies show that a driver using a cell phone is four times more likely to get into an collision than a driver focused on the road. Other studies show that dialing and texting carries the highest degree of risk of all cell phone-related activities, with motorists who text being 23 times more likely to have a collision. Teens and adults under 35 are the most frequent users of cell phones while driving.

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