NEWS
 
No rules for anchoring soccer nets in Ontario
After a 15 year old girl was killed in Bradford, the Ontario Soccer Association will be conducting a review...
3 0

It was on Wednesday afternoon, when two teens were messing around on a soccer net in Bradford.

It tipped over, and the crossbar slammed into the head of a 15 year old girl, killing her.

But it's not the first time something like this has happened.

There have been almost 100 deaths and serious injuries involving soccer nets across North America.

That makes almost one a year for the past 35 years.

One woman, Michelle Tran, has lived through that horror of losing a child. Zach was just 6 when he was crushed by a falling net in 2003.

In the years since, Michelle and her husband have started up Anchored For Safety, a group intent on changing the rules, making it mandatory that the nets are firmly anchored in place.

Already, legislation has been passed in Arkansas, Illinois and Wisconsin with legislation pending in New York.

"We'd rather go federal, but we're clicking them off one-by-one, because it's such a preventable, senseless tragedy." Tran told Newstalk1010.

As for what clubs and municipalities can use to make the structures safer, Tran says it's simple.

"Something as simple as a sandbag, which isn't ideal but it's better than nothing, to augers that go into the ground.

Closer to home, there are no rules mandating nets be firmly affixed to the ground here in Ontario.

President of the Ontario Soccer Association Ron Smale, says this most recent tragedy has forced them to take a new look at the way they do things.

"In my term since 2006, we haven't had the opportunity to do that, nor have we taken that opportunity. There needs to be a complete review of our system and our safety setup."

He says once that review is complete, he could bring it to the attention of the province.

Categories:

DON'T MISS

TED RADIO HOUR

Welcome to TED Radio Hour hosted by Guy Raz, Saturdays at 6pm and Sundays at 7pm

 
3 0

It was on Wednesday afternoon, when two teens were messing around on a soccer net in Bradford.

It tipped over, and the crossbar slammed into the head of a 15 year old girl, killing her.

But it's not the first time something like this has happened.

There have been almost 100 deaths and serious injuries involving soccer nets across North America.

That makes almost one a year for the past 35 years.

One woman, Michelle Tran, has lived through that horror of losing a child. Zach was just 6 when he was crushed by a falling net in 2003.

In the years since, Michelle and her husband have started up Anchored For Safety, a group intent on changing the rules, making it mandatory that the nets are firmly anchored in place.

Already, legislation has been passed in Arkansas, Illinois and Wisconsin with legislation pending in New York.

"We'd rather go federal, but we're clicking them off one-by-one, because it's such a preventable, senseless tragedy." Tran told Newstalk1010.

As for what clubs and municipalities can use to make the structures safer, Tran says it's simple.

"Something as simple as a sandbag, which isn't ideal but it's better than nothing, to augers that go into the ground.

Closer to home, there are no rules mandating nets be firmly affixed to the ground here in Ontario.

President of the Ontario Soccer Association Ron Smale, says this most recent tragedy has forced them to take a new look at the way they do things.

"In my term since 2006, we haven't had the opportunity to do that, nor have we taken that opportunity. There needs to be a complete review of our system and our safety setup."

He says once that review is complete, he could bring it to the attention of the province.

Top stories

A neighbour reported the alleged abuse