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OSPCA receives 20 calls per day about animals in hot cars
The Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals begins to track calls from 310-SPCA
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Photo: Canadian Press

For the first time, the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA) is tracking how many calls they receive about pets left in hot cars.

According to their investigation communication officer, Brad Dewar, they’ve received an average of 20 calls per day from central Ontario. This number is based on the calls to their 24-hour line, over the last five weeks.

Their call centre launched earlier this year at 310 – SPCA (7722) and can be used for any concerns within the province.

Dewar said it’s an important issue that needs to be addressed since a little bit of heat can do a lot of damage. “We’re only talking a difference in body temperature of 2-3 degrees, which doesn’t seem like much but for an animal, it’s the difference of it being healthy to dying,” he said.

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0 1
Photo: Canadian Press

For the first time, the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA) is tracking how many calls they receive about pets left in hot cars.

According to their investigation communication officer, Brad Dewar, they’ve received an average of 20 calls per day from central Ontario. This number is based on the calls to their 24-hour line, over the last five weeks.

Their call centre launched earlier this year at 310 – SPCA (7722) and can be used for any concerns within the province.

Dewar said it’s an important issue that needs to be addressed since a little bit of heat can do a lot of damage. “We’re only talking a difference in body temperature of 2-3 degrees, which doesn’t seem like much but for an animal, it’s the difference of it being healthy to dying,” he said.

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