NEWS
 
Mayoral candidates promise a week of major platform announcements
Major players in the race to be Toronto's Mayor promise significant announcement related to their campaign platforms
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Rob Ford, John Tory, and Olivia Chow are the frontrunners in Toronto's Mayoral race

As students go back to class and the rest of Toronto returns to a more regular routine, candidates in the city's Mayoral campaign wasted no time stealing the spotlight.

All of the major players have promised a week of important platform announcements.

John Tory spent Tuesday morning greeting transit riders at Kennedy Station with a provincial cabinet minister by his side.

Long-time Scarborough MPP Brad Duguid joined Tory on the trail, touting an endorsement that was made official last month.

While the two friends used to sit on opposite sides of the legislature, Duguid is backing Tory for Toronto's top job.

Ontario's Minister of Economic Development, Employment, and Infrastructure does not speak on behalf Queen's Park, but he suggested Tory has many allies across the political spectrum.

"John knows how to work with people and he knows how to work with (City) Council," Duguid says.

Olivia Chow rolled out a proposal to go after multi-million dollar real estate sales to raise money needed to fund transit expansion and City programs that provide breakfast to children who have no choice but to go to school hungry.

If elected Mayor, Chow pledges to add 1 percent in Land Transfer Tax fees to property deals over $2 million. 

She says that would help fund things like new buses and new subway lines.

Chow's plan estimates the rate hike would affect roughly 500 real estate transactions each year, generating up to $20 million dollars, annually.  

"In the grand scheme of things; if you can afford a $2-million house, you can afford to pay a little bit more," she says.

"It's not honest to say 'I can improve public transit' and 'I can do all these things for people' without having to find a way to pay for it."

Meanwhile, there was no sign of Rob Ford early on Tuesday but his brother and campaign manager was front-and-centre.

Doug Ford slung mud at John Tory, who leads in the latest opinion poll, calling the former Ontario Progressive-Conservative leader a 'flip-flopper.'

"It's whatever way the wind blows with this guy -- and you wonder why this guy's been a failure in business and in politics?" Ford says.

Rob Ford is set to spell out his plans for public transit at a news conference on Wednesday morning.

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3 0
Rob Ford, John Tory, and Olivia Chow are the frontrunners in Toronto's Mayoral race

As students go back to class and the rest of Toronto returns to a more regular routine, candidates in the city's Mayoral campaign wasted no time stealing the spotlight.

All of the major players have promised a week of important platform announcements.

John Tory spent Tuesday morning greeting transit riders at Kennedy Station with a provincial cabinet minister by his side.

Long-time Scarborough MPP Brad Duguid joined Tory on the trail, touting an endorsement that was made official last month.

While the two friends used to sit on opposite sides of the legislature, Duguid is backing Tory for Toronto's top job.

Ontario's Minister of Economic Development, Employment, and Infrastructure does not speak on behalf Queen's Park, but he suggested Tory has many allies across the political spectrum.

"John knows how to work with people and he knows how to work with (City) Council," Duguid says.

Olivia Chow rolled out a proposal to go after multi-million dollar real estate sales to raise money needed to fund transit expansion and City programs that provide breakfast to children who have no choice but to go to school hungry.

If elected Mayor, Chow pledges to add 1 percent in Land Transfer Tax fees to property deals over $2 million. 

She says that would help fund things like new buses and new subway lines.

Chow's plan estimates the rate hike would affect roughly 500 real estate transactions each year, generating up to $20 million dollars, annually.  

"In the grand scheme of things; if you can afford a $2-million house, you can afford to pay a little bit more," she says.

"It's not honest to say 'I can improve public transit' and 'I can do all these things for people' without having to find a way to pay for it."

Meanwhile, there was no sign of Rob Ford early on Tuesday but his brother and campaign manager was front-and-centre.

Doug Ford slung mud at John Tory, who leads in the latest opinion poll, calling the former Ontario Progressive-Conservative leader a 'flip-flopper.'

"It's whatever way the wind blows with this guy -- and you wonder why this guy's been a failure in business and in politics?" Ford says.

Rob Ford is set to spell out his plans for public transit at a news conference on Wednesday morning.

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