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Canadians watching less TV, streaming more
Time spent streaming up 45%
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Sami Smidi demonstrates an Internet capable TV Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011
The Canadian Press

Canadians spent a little less time channel surfing last year but still watched more TV content overall when accounting for streaming, suggests a report by the CRTC.

The average Canadian aged two or older watched 27.9 hours of TV a week in 2013 -- or about four hours nightly -- which was down by about 20 minutes from 2012, according to the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report.

But Canadian adults also devoted a good chunk of their free time to watching TV over the Internet.

The average adult streamed 1.9 hours of TV content in 2013, which was up about 45 per cent over the previous year.

Over 40 per cent of Canadians said they watched TV over the Internet in 2013.

Twenty-nine per cent of English-speaking Canadian adults said they used Netflix for streaming in 2013, up from 21 per cent in 2012.

French-speaking Canadian adults were less likely to use Netflix, with only seven per cent saying they did so in 2013.

While many Canadians chose to cut the cord in 2013 and go without a TV subscription, they still represented a small minority.

There were about 100,000 fewer Canadian households subscribing to a TV plan last year, but 11.92 million were still paying for access to a bevy of channels.

The CRTC also found Canadians were listening to a little less radio in 2013, tuning in for an average of 19.3 hours a week compared to 19.6 hours in 2012. About one in five Canadians said they were using an online music streaming service last year.

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  1. Angry Bill posted on 09/04/2014 03:27 PM
    Well, it's not terribly surprising. For decades, Rogers and Bell have become more and more expensive. Their business model means you must pay for 90% of the channels you don't want, if you want to get the 10% of channels that you do want.

    A year or so ago, we dropped Rogers and now we stream movies and TV shows. We don't get the convenience of TV, but the lack of a cable bill more than makes up for it. I just can't justify paying what the cable providers want for their services. It's not worth it to me. And apparently more and more Canadians are coming to that same conclusion. I therefore wouldn't be surprised if the big companies try to change their business model, but even if they do, it probably still wouldn't be enough.
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1 0
Sami Smidi demonstrates an Internet capable TV Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011
The Canadian Press

Canadians spent a little less time channel surfing last year but still watched more TV content overall when accounting for streaming, suggests a report by the CRTC.

The average Canadian aged two or older watched 27.9 hours of TV a week in 2013 -- or about four hours nightly -- which was down by about 20 minutes from 2012, according to the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report.

But Canadian adults also devoted a good chunk of their free time to watching TV over the Internet.

The average adult streamed 1.9 hours of TV content in 2013, which was up about 45 per cent over the previous year.

Over 40 per cent of Canadians said they watched TV over the Internet in 2013.

Twenty-nine per cent of English-speaking Canadian adults said they used Netflix for streaming in 2013, up from 21 per cent in 2012.

French-speaking Canadian adults were less likely to use Netflix, with only seven per cent saying they did so in 2013.

While many Canadians chose to cut the cord in 2013 and go without a TV subscription, they still represented a small minority.

There were about 100,000 fewer Canadian households subscribing to a TV plan last year, but 11.92 million were still paying for access to a bevy of channels.

The CRTC also found Canadians were listening to a little less radio in 2013, tuning in for an average of 19.3 hours a week compared to 19.6 hours in 2012. About one in five Canadians said they were using an online music streaming service last year.

Leave a comment:

showing all comments · Subscribe to comments
  1. Angry Bill posted on 09/04/2014 03:27 PM
    Well, it's not terribly surprising. For decades, Rogers and Bell have become more and more expensive. Their business model means you must pay for 90% of the channels you don't want, if you want to get the 10% of channels that you do want.

    A year or so ago, we dropped Rogers and now we stream movies and TV shows. We don't get the convenience of TV, but the lack of a cable bill more than makes up for it. I just can't justify paying what the cable providers want for their services. It's not worth it to me. And apparently more and more Canadians are coming to that same conclusion. I therefore wouldn't be surprised if the big companies try to change their business model, but even if they do, it probably still wouldn't be enough.
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